The Buzz

High Altitude Honey: Secrets of the Mountaintop Honey Harvest

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For some, urban rooftop honey is about as high altitude as it gets. But it gets even higher. And the higher it gets, the more difficult it is to pull off making and harvesting honey. Below, long-time bee keeper Jean Vasicek shares her high-altitude secrets and what she does throughout the summer and into the fall to keep her bees alive throughout the year.

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Topics: Insider, Beekeepers, Bee Life, How-to, Protecting Bees and Pollinators

The Life of a Honeybee

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Honeybees lives in a sophisticated, well-organized society. Colonies comprise a staggering 50,000 to 60,000 bees, each performing different roles in order to help ensure the smooth running, success—and life—of their colony. The lifespan of honeybees varies, depending on the role of an individual bee within its colony.

Let's take a look at those roles and what they mean for one of the most sophisticated and organized animals on our planet.

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Topics: Insider, Bee Life, History, Save the Bees

Bee Brain: The Waggle Dance

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So-called "lower" organisms often show sophisticated learning abilities that aid their survival and reproduction. Bees and their relatives are especially good at learning the location and appearance of flowers.

How do they do this? The waggle dance.

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Topics: Insider, Bee Life, History, Save the Bees

What Can I Do to Save the Bees?

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Sure, you may not be able to set up hives on your roof or in your back yard anytime soon. But to save our endangered bees, you don't need to. Believe it or not, there are several other simple things we can do to help keep bees in our communities flourishing.

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Topics: Insider, Bee Life, Colony Collapse Disorder, How-to, Save the Bees

What Is Colony Collapse Disorder?

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In recent years scientists have fretted over the future of bees, and although research has shed much light on the crisis, those in the bee business—from hive keepers to commercial farmers—say the insects remain in deep trouble as their colonies continue to struggle.

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Topics: Insider, Bee Life, Colony Collapse Disorder, History, Save the Bees

Is Bee Raw Honey Kosher?

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Yes indeed. Pure, unadulterated honey is by definition kosher. And Bee Raw's single varietal honeys are all100% real, raw honey. The kosher status of our honey is certified by Rabbi Zushe Blech with EarthKosher, a certification agency that specializes in organic, green and sustainable foods. Rav Ha’Machshir Blech was formerly the regional director for the Kashrus division of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America (the “OU”).

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Topics: Insider, Raw Honey, Bee Life, Recipes, Kosher

Spring Bees

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How do bees behave in the Spring? Well, in an ultra productive way—and with alot of flowers. Honey bees and flowers have a longstanding relationship. For millions of years honey bees have been pollinators of flowers and, thus, the plants producing the flowers have relied on bees.

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Topics: Bee Life

Spring Agendas



How do bees behave in the Spring? Well, in an ultra productive way—and with alot of flowers. Honey bees and flowers have a longstanding relationship. For millions of years honey bees have been pollinators of flowers and, thus, the plants producing the flowers have relied on bees. The goal of the plant is reproduction; the bees help accomplish this by unwittingly transferring pollen, a plant's male sperm cells, from one flower to another. Without pollination, many plants would not be able to procreate and eventually would die out. Bees prevent that from happening—especially in the Spring. But flowers have some Spring time behavior, too. Flowers often attract bees through their color and the promise of sweet nectar. A great number of flowers produce colors that fall into the ultraviolet range which are not visible to humans—but are to bees. Flower shape can also play a role; some flowers are shaped for specific pollinators like bees where the pollen-carrying structure on the plant is positioned perfectly to deposit pollen on the insect as it crawls into the flower. Plants also can use fragrances and odors to draw bees to them. Sound complex? Such is the beautiful life of bees and the Spring flowers that attract them.—Zeke

Buying Bee Raw Honey > Single Varietal Honey > Rare Single Varietal Honey

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Topics: Bee Life

The NightLife of a Bee



The Great Sleepy Bee. Where do bees go after a long hard day of work? Not to bed, rather back to the hive where they will actually rest. Bees don't sleep in the same way we do, but they do stop their activity and go into a dormant state. Some bees do have working functions during the night, but most of them will return to the hive for some shuteye.
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Topics: Bee Life

Eye See You



Like other insects, the honey bee has compound eyes—hundreds of single eyes (called ommatidia) arranged next to each other, each with its own lens and each looking in a different direction. This doesn't mean that the bee sees lots of little pictures, as each ommatidium sees only one intensity, contributing a 'pixel' to the overall image perceived by the compound eye, just like a single photoreceptor in the retina of our own eye. But there are differences between the bee's view of the world and ours.

The bee has fewer ommatidia than we have photoreceptors, and they are not evenly spaced. And of course the bee sees colours differently, relies more on image motion than on shapes, and much more.

Bees may not have eyes in the back of their head, but you can be sure—they see you well before you see them.—N.B.
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Topics: Bee Life