The Life of a Honeybee

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Honeybees lives in a sophisticated, well-organized society. Colonies comprise a staggering 50,000 to 60,000 bees, each performing different roles in order to help ensure the smooth running, success—and life—of their colony. The lifespan of honeybees varies, depending on the role of an individual bee within its colony.

Let's take a look at those roles and what they mean for one of the most sophisticated and organized animals on our planet.

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Topics: Raw Honey, Save the Bees, Bee Trivia

Bee Brain: The Waggle Dance

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So-called "lower" organisms often show sophisticated learning abilities that aid their survival and reproduction. Bees and their relatives are especially good at learning the location and appearance of flowers.

How do they do this? The waggle dance.

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Topics: Raw Honey, Save the Bees, Bee Trivia

Grilling with Honey: An American Tradition

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Few activities evoke American leisure time more than grilling, but can Americans lay claim to inventing the technique? In a word, no. Grilling, when the term is used loosely, dates back to shortly after the discovery of fire by our ancient ancestors—some 500,000 to one million years ago, well before Dad started flipping burgers in the backyard.

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Topics: Raw Honey, Entertaining, Home Chef, Bee Trivia

What Is Colony Collapse Disorder?

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In recent years scientists have fretted over the future of bees, and although research has shed much light on the crisis, those in the bee business—from hive keepers to commercial farmers—say the insects remain in deep trouble as their colonies continue to struggle.

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Topics: Raw Honey, Save the Bees, Bee Trivia

Easter Ham or Easter Lamb?

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With Easter right around the corner, it’s time to pledge your allegiance: is your family Team Ham or Team Lamb? Before tempers rage and holiday scuffles ensue, let us look at the facts.

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Topics: Raw Honey, Home Chef, Bee Trivia

Communication Breakdown

"In the early '90s a new kind of pesticide entered the market called neonicotinoids and phenylpyrazoles that damage the nervous system of honey bees. The result? Bees that are unable to communicate accurately with the bees in their hive. Communication between honey bees is essential to telegraph the location of food sources, as well warn about dangerous spots. What's worse, the infected honey bee flies back to the hive to contaminate their entire colony—and a weakened colony dies as a result of this pesticide.""

Zeke Freeman
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Topics: Bee Trivia

Presidential Honey



From the George Whashington White House to the White House of today, there is one staple in the kitchen that hasn't gone away: raw honey. Made popular by George Washington and his special breakfast cakes, White House Executive Chef Cristeta Comerford maintains the honey tradition with her Comander in Chief Peanut Butter & Honey sandwiches. Yep, even the President needs a little comfort food from time to time. —Zeke     
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Topics: Bee Trivia

Spring Agendas



How do bees behave in the Spring? Well, in an ultra productive way—and with alot of flowers. Honey bees and flowers have a longstanding relationship. For millions of years honey bees have been pollinators of flowers and, thus, the plants producing the flowers have relied on bees. The goal of the plant is reproduction; the bees help accomplish this by unwittingly transferring pollen, a plant's male sperm cells, from one flower to another. Without pollination, many plants would not be able to procreate and eventually would die out. Bees prevent that from happening—especially in the Spring. But flowers have some Spring time behavior, too. Flowers often attract bees through their color and the promise of sweet nectar. A great number of flowers produce colors that fall into the ultraviolet range which are not visible to humans—but are to bees. Flower shape can also play a role; some flowers are shaped for specific pollinators like bees where the pollen-carrying structure on the plant is positioned perfectly to deposit pollen on the insect as it crawls into the flower. Plants also can use fragrances and odors to draw bees to them. Sound complex? Such is the beautiful life of bees and the Spring flowers that attract them. —Zeke

Buying Bee Raw Honey > Single Varietal Honey > Rare Single Varietal Honey

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Topics: Bee Trivia

How Many Bees Does it Take?

"It takes one entire colony of honey bees (nearly 30,000 bees) to pollinate a mere one acre of fruit trees."

Zeke Freeman
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Topics: Bee Trivia

A Day in the Life



Bees live in colonies. In those colonies there are 3 types of members: queens, drones, and workers.

The queen can live from 2-5 years, while the drone only 40-50 days. Drones are male bees, yet most of the bees in the colony are workers making honey and stinging for defense.

The workers are females and they live from 1-4 months.

As you can see, bee life varies wildly, each with its own lifecycle. Here's a closer look. The lifecycle of the worker bee: Egg (3 days), Larva (6 days), Pupa (12 days). This is a total of 21 days from egg (baby) to adult worker. The lifecycle of the drone is 24 days, while the queen's is 16 days.

What do bees actually have in common? Clearly not their time on Earth. Rather, in common is their interconnectedness—their reliance upon each other, and their respective roles, to survive as a colony. 

Sounds a little bit like that other buzzing colony known as the human race.—N.B.


The Save the Bees Fund > Seeds that will Save the Bees > Raw Honey Gifts
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Topics: Bee Trivia

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