The Buzz

Communication Breakdown

"In the early '90s a new kind of pesticide entered the market called neonicotinoids and phenylpyrazoles that damage the nervous system of honey bees. The result? Bees that are unable to communicate accurately with the bees in their hive. Communication between honey bees is essential to telegraph the location of food sources, as well warn about dangerous spots. What's worse, the infected honey bee flies back to the hive to contaminate their entire colony—and a weakened colony dies as a result of this pesticide.""

Zeke Freeman
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How Many Bees Does it Take?

"It takes one entire colony of honey bees (nearly 30,000 bees) to pollinate a mere one acre of fruit trees."

Zeke Freeman
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A Day in the Life



Bees live in colonies. In those colonies there are 3 types of members: queens, drones, and workers.

The queen can live from 2-5 years, while the drone only 40-50 days. Drones are male bees, yet most of the bees in the colony are workers making honey and stinging for defense.

The workers are females and they live from 1-4 months.

As you can see, bee life varies wildly, each with its own lifecycle. Here's a closer look. The lifecycle of the worker bee: Egg (3 days), Larva (6 days), Pupa (12 days). This is a total of 21 days from egg (baby) to adult worker. The lifecycle of the drone is 24 days, while the queen's is 16 days.

What do bees actually have in common? Clearly not their time on Earth. Rather, in common is their interconnectedness—their reliance upon each other, and their respective roles, to survive as a colony. 

Sounds a little bit like that other buzzing colony known as the human race.—N.B.


The Save the Bees Fund > Seeds that will Save the Bees > Raw Honey Gifts
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