The Buzz

Hot Hives

"Bees can flap their wings as fast as 11,000 times per second; but not just for flight, they flap their wings to do a lot of things. One of those things is to heat and cool the hive at all times. Overall, the worker bee's wing flaps keep the hive at an all year around steady temperature of 92 to 93 sweltering degrees. "

Zeke
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Topics: The Apiarium

Safe to Eat it Raw?

"Raw honey is one of the world's safest foods. But how can something that is not processed or at the very least filtered be so safe? The reason is that most harmful bacteria cannot live within raw honey for any length of time. By the time it's in the hive and on your table it's safe to eat. "

Zeke Freeman
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Topics: The Apiarium

It Comes from a Flower



For most of us it comes from a jar. For the men and women who run our apiaries—it comes from a hive. But for the bees making it—it comes from a flower. Hundreds of them. Star thistle flowers, clover flowers (above), basswood, sage, blueberry, sweet raspberry, orange blossom and sourwood flowers. I could go on. We call the honey we gratefully acquire from the work of our bees varietals. With each different flower, a different varietal—and a different sublime taste, all thanks to the beautiful work of those buzzing bees. From our table to yours.—Zeke

Buying Bee Raw Honey > Single Varietal Honey > Rare Single Varietal Honey

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Topics: The Apiarium

She's Such a Ten!



Staggering. Yes, she's as beautiful as a ten. And yes, when this beauty stings you, it hurts ten times more than the last beauty you had. Her figure? Stunning. But I hear she's a ten figure gal. She is. 144,000,000,000,000 to be exact—which is the ten figure number of bees in the U.S. today. And yes, that's 144 Billion. Stunning, yes, but let's keep it that way because these beauties are in jeopardy, disappearing at an alarming rate. For instance, Since 2006, North American migratory beekeepers have seen an annual 30 percent to 90 percent loss in their colonies; non-migratory beekeepers noted an annual loss of over 50 percent. Similar losses were reported in Canada, as well as several countries in Europe, Asia, and Central and South America. Find out how you can help save these beautiful bees.—N.B.

The Save the Bees Fund > Seeds that will Save the Bees > Raw Honey Gifts
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Topics: The Apiarium

Processed Sugar or Raw Honey?

"Both raw honey and processed sugar contain glucose and fructose. However, for sugar, in the process of manufacturing it, the organic acids, protein, nitrogen elements, enzymes and vitamins in the sugar cane are destroyed. In raw honey, however, a natural sweetener, they are not. Healthier, raw, and real—honey is simply better for us. And adding to its benefits is its versatility because it can be used in literally every form of cooking—for breakfast, lunch, the appetizers you make, dinner, dessert, and for your favorite cocktails. Now that's something to think about."

Zeke Freeman, Owner, Bee Raw Honey
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Topics: The Apiarium

Evolutionary Miracles?

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Topics: The Apiarium

Royal Jelly?

"Yes, you read correctly. Royal. But you won't find The Duke of Edinburgh, The Prince of Wales or The Duchess of Cornwall anywhere near it. That's because Royal Jelly is a creamy-white substance that is fed to larvae (baby bees) to turn them into Queen Bees. It acts as a megavitamin. If a bee receives Royal Jelly, she turns into a Queen, and if she does not, she remains a sterile worker bee. Royally cool, yes?"

Zeke Freeman, Founder Bee Raw Honey
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Topics: The Apiarium

Baking with Bee Raw

Yep, you can bake with it and as the colder months draw nearer, we're about to do more of it. The truth is raw honey will provide some special attributes to your baked goods—among them, a golden crust color, a unique flavor, moistness, and moisture retention in the product. Why try honey instead of processed sugar? Every unique varietal of honey will add an equally unique variety of flavor to your baked goods. Honey's flavor varies with the type of flower the bees worked to produce the honey. These flavors include blueberry, cranberry, orange blossom, sage, wildflower, sweet yellow clover, and wild rasberry to name a few. Just imagine the hint of those flavors infused in your favorite baked goods. We're hungry already.

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Topics: The Apiarium

Bee Bread?

"Yes, bee bread. But it's not what you think. You don't bake it, and you can't buy it at a bakery. Nope, bee bread is the name of that unique and life-sustaining mixture of collected pollen and nectar—or honey—deposited in the cells of a comb that bees eat to live."

Neal Boulton, The Buzz
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Topics: The Apiarium

High Altitude Honey

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Topics: The Apiarium