Honor our Earth by Planting a Seed

 

How will your little actions contribute to a more sustainable future?

Powerful things come in small numbers. Take, for instance, the power of one seed. It doesn't take much for it to slowly grow into the plant it's meant to be. When it blooms, a bee arrives to the flower for its nurishment—pollinates it—then flies away to another flower. Each separate varietal of flower gives the bee a separate nutrient. The more flowers, the more well rounded and healthy the bee's diet is. 

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Topics: Save the Bees

It Comes from a Flower



For most of us it comes from a jar. For the men and women who run our apiaries—it comes from a hive. But for the bees making it—it comes from a flower. Hundreds of them. Star thistle flowers, clover flowers (above), basswood, sage, blueberry, sweet raspberry, orange blossom and sourwood flowers. I could go on. We call the honey we gratefully acquire from the work of our bees varietals. With each different flower, a different varietal—and a different sublime taste, all thanks to the beautiful work of those buzzing bees. From our table to yours. —Zeke

Buying Bee Raw Honey > Single Varietal Honey > Rare Single Varietal Honey

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Topics: Save the Bees, Bee Trivia

Not Resolute? Dream Out Loud.


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Topics: Save the Bees

The Nightlife of a Bee



The Great Sleepy Bee. Where do bees go after a long hard day of work? Not to bed, rather back to the hive where they will actually rest. Bees don't sleep in the same way we do, but they do stop their activity and go into a dormant state. Some bees do have working functions during the night, but most of them will return to the hive for some shuteye.
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Topics: Save the Bees, Bee Trivia

Eye See You



Like other insects, the honey bee has compound eyes—hundreds of single eyes (called ommatidia) arranged next to each other, each with its own lens and each looking in a different direction. This doesn't mean that the bee sees lots of little pictures, as each ommatidium sees only one intensity, contributing a 'pixel' to the overall image perceived by the compound eye, just like a single photoreceptor in the retina of our own eye. But there are differences between the bee's view of the world and ours.

The bee has fewer ommatidia than we have photoreceptors, and they are not evenly spaced. And of course the bee sees colours differently, relies more on image motion than on shapes, and much more.

Bees may not have eyes in the back of their head, but you can be sure—they see you well before you see them. —N.B.
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Topics: Save the Bees, Bee Trivia

She's Such a Ten!



Staggering. Yes, she's as beautiful as a ten. And yes, when this beauty stings you, it hurts ten times more than the last beauty you had. Her figure? Stunning. But I hear she's a ten figure gal. She is. 144,000,000,000,000 to be exact—which is the ten figure number of bees in the U.S. today. And yes, that's 144 Billion. Stunning, yes, but let's keep it that way because these beauties are in jeopardy, disappearing at an alarming rate. For instance, Since 2006, North American migratory beekeepers have seen an annual 30 percent to 90 percent loss in their colonies; non-migratory beekeepers noted an annual loss of over 50 percent. Similar losses were reported in Canada, as well as several countries in Europe, Asia, and Central and South America.  Find out how you can help save these beautiful bees.—N.B.

The Save the Bees Fund > Seeds that will Save the Bees > Raw Honey Gifts
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Topics: Save the Bees, Bee Trivia

The Power of One



They say more is better. We agree—where planting bee friendly plants is concerned that is. But sometimes powerful things come in small numbers. Take, for instance, the power of one seed. It doesn't take much for it to slowly grow into the plant it's meant to be. When it blooms, a bee arrives to the flower for its nurishment—pollinates it—then flies away to another flower. Each separate varietal of flower gives the bee a separate nutrient. The more flowers, the more well rounded and healthy the bee's diet is. 

Sound familiar? It's the same for us humans: broccoli, which bees polinate, give you and I great amounts of vitamin D; carrots, vitamin A; blueberries, vitamin C.

Everything our bee feeds from, like everything we do, begins with one seed. And the more of those seeds we plant, the healthier the bees are. 

Plants don't need humans, but they do need bees, which is why the power of one seed is very powerful indeed. —N.B.

The Save the Bees Fund > Seeds that will Save the Bees > Raw Honey Gifts
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Topics: Save the Bees

She Gets Around



We won't call her promiscuous—but she does get around. The queen bee that is. When one queen survives in a colony, she will fly out on a sunny, warm day to a drone congregation area where she will mate with 12-15 drones. If the weather holds, she may return to the drone congregation area for several days until she is fully mated. The young queen stores the sperm in her spermatheca. She will selectively release sperm from that one mating flight for the remaining 2-7 years of her life.

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Topics: Save the Bees, Bee Trivia

A Day in the Life



Bees live in colonies. In those colonies there are 3 types of members: queens, drones, and workers.

The queen can live from 2-5 years, while the drone only 40-50 days. Drones are male bees, yet most of the bees in the colony are workers making honey and stinging for defense.

The workers are females and they live from 1-4 months.

As you can see, bee life varies wildly, each with its own lifecycle. Here's a closer look. The lifecycle of the worker bee: Egg (3 days), Larva (6 days), Pupa (12 days). This is a total of 21 days from egg (baby) to adult worker. The lifecycle of the drone is 24 days, while the queen's is 16 days.

What do bees actually have in common? Clearly not their time on Earth. Rather, in common is their interconnectedness—their reliance upon each other, and their respective roles, to survive as a colony. 

Sounds a little bit like that other buzzing colony known as the human race. —N.B.


The Save the Bees Fund > Seeds that will Save the Bees > Raw Honey Gifts
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Topics: Save the Bees, Bee Trivia

Let's Do This!



Bees provide 1 out of 3 bites of food on our plates because of the work they do. They take care of us—now it's our turn to take care of them. And take care we must—bees are dying off at an alarming rate. Think pandemic. But everyday folks like you can help. I'm trying to with the Save the Bees Fund that I just launched (above). How can you help? Start with my  3 No Fail Ways Even YOU Can Save the Bees. Let's do this! —Zeke

The Save the Bees Fund > Seeds that will Save the Bees > Raw Honey Gifts
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Topics: Save the Bees